New Paintings

Paris Bistro, oil on canvas, 24 x 18 inches, 2024
Camondo-Dining-Room-30×30 inches, oil on canvas, 2023
Chantilly1, 20×24 inches, oil on canvas, 2024
Camondo2, 30×40 inches, oil on canvas, 2024
Prêt-à-porter, 18×24 inches, oil on canvas, 2024
Chantilly2, 30x24inches, oil on canvas, 2024
Flowers from a friend, 30x24inche, oil on canvas, 2024

Haptic Splendour

For the past 15 years, I’ve painted opulent European 18th and 19th century interiors. Designed as theatrical displays of status and power by wealthy aristocrats and bourgeoisie, these formerly private sites are now museums, providing entertainment and pleasure for touristic consumption, while also opening up a space for philosophical contemplation.

Although I use photography as a structural device through which I enter the painting process, with each piece I always seem to arrive at a point of crisis where I need to break free from the tyranny of the image. Through partly destroying the image I discover fresh solutions to painterly problems I set for myself.

Throughout my childhood and into my mid-twenties, I was a ballet dancer. That intense training of spatial awareness and interpretive questioning is still deeply stamped in my DNA. A painting to me is a kind of choreography; there’s a haptic dance that takes place from my optical experience of an image, through to the way my nervous system signals to my body how to translate and record it. As painter/dancer I tease out meaning through working and reworking, coming up to speed as I gain understanding, and making the last strikes with absolute commitment.

John Cleese on Creativity

An artist friend tipped me about this excellent lecture on YouTube by British comedian John Cleese, on which he succinctly outlines key elements for creativity.

Cleese: “Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating.”

Link to the lecture here